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News & Politics => United States => Topic started by: jdaniele on June 17, 2018, 11:34:39 PM

Title: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on June 17, 2018, 11:34:39 PM
With todays new from Forbes about "Texas Republican Party Endorses Marijuana Decriminalization" I decided to create a thread about the subject. I want to make sure we only post verified or confirmed information. Information about what we hear (meaning just "word of mouth") can't be used unless you state its something making it clear it wasn't verified. Please make sure we site everything and why its useful.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomangell/2018/06/17/texas-republican-party-endorses-marijuana-decriminalization/#3d7573ff5236

First off facts about marijuana are everywhere. The Nation Institute on Drug Abuse, say the following about the what marijuana is.
Quote
Marijuana is the most commonly used illicit drug in the United States. Its use is widespread among young people. In 2015, more than 11 million young adults ages 18 to 25 used marijuana in the past year. According to the Monitoring the Future survey, rates of marijuana use among middle and high school students have dropped or leveled off in the past few years after several years of increase. However, the number of young people who believe regular marijuana use is risky is decreasing.
https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/marijuana

Now that we know what marijuana is, why is this topic so important? Marijuana has been found to have life changing benefits for people will the existing cancer disease. There is currently no known cure but there is treatments and patients have to go through a terrible process to kill the disease by force but its not a 100% guarantee the disease will be killed. This process uses something called, "chemotherapy" which according to WebMD, "it’s a way to treat cancer that uses drugs to kill cancer cells." This can leave people feeling sick and can't eat. Some people have said by smoking marijuana they are now able to eat which makes the process less upsetting and helps them continue fighting the disease. Business Insider reported, "Since at least 2017, drug company GW Pharmaceuticals has been presenting strong research data to suggest that its CBD-based medicine, a syrup called Epidiolex, can treat the symptoms of two rare forms of childhood epilepsy that are characterized by violent seizures (known as drop seizures)." which is just one product being introduced to the market.

https://www.webmd.com/cancer/chemotherapy-what-to-expect#1
http://www.businessinsider.com/marijuana-cbd-boom-cbd-2018-6

There's a lot of issues with the use of marijuana even though it has now been reported to help or in some cases said to even cure someone of their disease (including cancer). This hasn't been proven medically and can't be proven due to the legal restrictions in the United States. Why is it illegal to study marijuana if it is helping so much? This is the big debate right now. According to the DEA, marijuana (cannabis) is classified as a Schedule 1 drug. "Schedule I drugs, substances, or chemicals are defined as drugs with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse." Marijuana to the DEA, is in the same category as heroin, lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy), methaqualone, and peyote. This type of classification can mean that even if a study is performed it won't and can't be excepted as fact even if a scientist and/or medical doctor proves its useful.

https://www.dea.gov/druginfo/ds.shtml

According to Business Insider, "Recreational marijuana is legal in nine states and medical marijuana is legal in 29 states." and this is growing. "Marijuana prohibition began 80 years ago when the federal government put a ban on the sale, cultivation, and use of the cannabis plant. It remains illegal on the federal level." which (again) is the issue. Any ban on the federal level means (legally) any state law allowing marijuana use and/or sale is automatically void. Now sometime in October 2009, the Obama Administration sent a memo to federal prosecutors encouraging not to prosecute people who distribute marijuana for medical purposes in accordance with state law. On the NCSL website you can find studies have been done about the use of medical marijuana, these studies "have found that marijuana is effective in relieving some of the symptoms of HIV/AIDS, cancer, glaucoma, and multiple sclerosis." I won't go too much into those studies but they can be found in the sited link.

http://www.businessinsider.com/legal-marijuana-states-2018-1
http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/state-medical-marijuana-laws.aspx

There is A LOT of popularity on the subject because a good amount of people feel marijuana shouldn't be illegal in the first place and should be openly sold to the public. The big idea is treating marijuana similar to alcohol. This would mean only adults (age 21 and older) can opening buy and use the product. This growing trend means companies are watching and waiting. This would open a very large market because polls report many people are buying marijuana now in the black market but nothing is regulated and by making it legal would mean it can be seen as "safer" and also be taxed. This would not only allow people having trouble accessing marijuana for medical purposes much easier it would just make it available to almost anyone and would cripple illegal drug dealers. The Motley Fool (which gives advise about investing) today posted an article titled, "7 Reasons Marijuana Won't Be Legalized in the U.S." that basically goes over how the rules, laws, compliance, studies, etc aren't all in place yet. However legislation is always being made and more is to come. On top of that, sitting President, Donald Trump said (according to The New York Times), “We’re looking at it. But I probably will end up supporting that, yes,” when asked about one of the bills. Trump has talked about support states the ability to choose whether to legalize marijuana or not.

https://www.fool.com/investing/2018/06/17/7-reasons-marijuana-wont-be-legalized-in-the-us.aspx
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/08/us/politics/trump-marijuana-bill-states.html

Each state as of now has or is making different rules on the topic but a lot of debate is happening.

*Please note this post was originally posted on June 17 of 2018 and might be updated at a later date but will specify.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on June 17, 2018, 11:45:34 PM
I don't use marijuana but I'm actually excited about the topic because of how big it is in the news right now. I posted a link to this thread on my personal blog. https://www.jeremydaniele.com/ lol
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on August 21, 2018, 02:04:04 AM
Great article to add to the observation/opinion research.
https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2018/8/20/17759820/marijuana-addiction-cannabis-use-disorder-legalization

It starts off by calling out that just because people say its good doesn't mean it actually is.
Quote
It is now widely accepted that marijuana is, at the very least, less dangerous than other recreational drugs. The typical line you’ll hear — I certainly do in my email inbox — is that “marijuana is harmless,” often meant as a justification for legalizing cannabis.
Quote from: Annie Lowrey at The Atlantic
For Keith Humphreys, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford University, the most compelling evidence of the deleterious effects comes from users themselves. “In large national surveys, about one in 10 people who smoke it say they have a lot of problems. They say things like, ‘I have trouble quitting. I think a lot about quitting and I can’t do it. I smoked more than I intended to. I neglect responsibilities.’ There are plenty of people who have problems with it, in terms of things like concentration, short-term memory, and motivation,” he said. “People will say, ‘Oh, that’s just you fuddy-duddy doctors.’ Actually, no. It’s millions of people who use the drug who say that it causes problems.”
Quote
People say marijuana is harmless, largely based on their own experiences with the drug. When it comes to countering that narrative, it’s one thing for doctors or Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agents to claim that pot really is harmful — that can be easy to ignore. But when marijuana users themselves claim to have problems, maybe that’s worth listening to and taking seriously.

The evidence is the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). The most recent version, from 2016, found that about 4 million people 12 and older meet the classification for a marijuana use disorder — due to the kinds of problems that Humphreys noted. That’s nearly 11 percent of the 37.6 million people 12 and older who reportedly used marijuana in 2016.

These are real people with real problems. Lowrey follows the story of Evan, whose personal life and law career slipped as he found himself compulsively using marijuana, letting it take over his life.

We all know this as facts but don't really mention it because its one thing that I hear people want the government to let go of. From a social justice issue it does makes sense. People are going to do it so why bother locking up so many people when you can just make money on it and control it. At the very least let people make their own choices. The right to free will is at stake.

Quote
That doesn’t mean marijuana is anywhere as dangerous as cocaine, heroin, alcohol, or smoked tobacco, all of which carry a real risk of death that pot doesn’t. But weed isn’t harmless.

Quote
When evaluating whether to legalize, the question should not be whether marijuana is harmless, but whether pot’s harms and the harms of legalizing it outweigh the harms of prohibition. It’s a cost-benefit analysis.

On the cost side, will legalization, by increasing access and potentially use, lead to more overuse and addiction to marijuana? Will it lead to more car crashes, mental health issues, and respiratory problems (all of which are problems linked to pot in the scientific research)?

On the benefit side, will legalization lead to fewer arrests over a drug that is, after all, still not that bad compared to other drugs (given that it can’t cause overdose deaths)? Will the revenue drug cartels lose from illicit marijuana make them less powerful and less able to carry out violent acts around the world? Will legalization be a boon for people who could benefit from pot medically, given its potential use as a treatment for pain, muscle stiffness, and other issues? Will a regulated market be able to tame the risks of the drug better than prohibition has, particularly by keeping it away from children?

And how will all of these potential costs and benefits balance out — a net gain or net loss?

The jury is still out on a lot of these questions. Drug policy experts caution that more years of legalization and more research into the policy’s implementation are needed before a hard conclusion can be reached.

So many good points.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on September 21, 2018, 05:07:35 PM
NJ Governor is pushing hard on this.
https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2018/09/weve_seen_the_plan_for_legal_weed_but_when_might_n.html
The part that is important here is old charges in my opinion.
Quote
Expungements -- the wiping away of certain criminal convictions, in this case marijuana-related ones -- are a key piece of Murphy's social justice platform as it relates to legal weed. They are also seen as crucial to getting the votes needed to legalize weed.
Its costing NJ so much to have this many people in jail for possession.
Quote
But as eager as the governor and these legislators are to get legal weed done -- and some are still hoping the bill can be introduced this month -- several key issues still need to be worked out, likely pushing legalization into the fall.

A source close to the bill negotiations, who asked not to be identified over fears that it would hurt discussions, said Tuesday that a hearing on the bill in the Legislature on Sept. 27 is still a possibility and that the group of lawmakers expect to meet with Murphy's team later this week.
Quote
The lawmakers have long expected to make minor tweaks to the bill based on Murphy's feedback before introduction, but some of those tweaks may not be so minor.

A report from Politico New Jersey this week suggests that Murphy is unhappy with the 10 percent tax presented in the legalization bill, which would be the lowest marijuana tax in the country.

Murphy on Tuesday tried to distance himself from that report, saying that his administration hasn't made up its mind about marijuana taxes.

...

Murphy had previously called for a higher tax on marijuana, which suggests that taxes could be one of the first points of contention when the governor speaks with legislators.
Getting those people out of jail, collecting the sin tax (at a higher rate), and getting the licenses out are key. People are going to buy the product. Buying in this manner will be a game changer in the country. Some of complained about not being allowed to grow it themselves but this again is key for the industry. I honestly don't think they will arrest anyone for growing it themselves once this is all said and done but we soon shall see.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on September 25, 2018, 12:49:41 AM
This APP article has a ton of information of the new bill and what to do with people who have already been convicted. I'll post link but keep in mind it has a ton of ads.

https://www.app.com/story/news/local/new-jersey/marijuana/2018/09/24/new-jersey-marijuana-legal-weed-automatic-expungement/1294218002/
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on October 14, 2018, 09:37:28 PM
So NJ seems to want to go for October 29th of 2018 for their legalization.

https://patch.com/new-jersey/princeton/nj-sets-possible-date-marijuana-legalization-tax

Quote
Murphy and lawmakers say they're looking at Oct 29 as the day the state Legislature should pass a bill legalizing marijuana in New Jersey. It's not clear if the governor would actually sign it that day, or right afterward.

Murphy was asked about marijuana legalization during a recent Facebook live interview, and he told the audience that he's looking at signing something "sooner than later." You can watch him speak about it below.

"We've had good exchanges with both the legislative leadership sponsors and, most importantly, the teams in the trenches crafting this," Murphy said. "I think it's sooner than later."

He also said that, based the tenor of the discussions and the give-and-take between the Murphy administration and lawmakers, Oct. 29 "feels about right."

Murphy said there will be several pieces to the legislation, including expansion of the medical marijuana program. The "biggest mountain to climb," he said, will be legalizing the drug for recreational use.

What could stand in the way is that Democratic leaders in the state Legislature are standing by a 12 percent tax on recreational marijuana. The tax is controversial, and some legislative debate over it could delay the passage date.

Senate President Stephen Sweeney said he'll go no higher than a 12 percent on recreational marijuana, endorsing the rate pushed by state Sen. Nicholas Scutari, D-Middlesex, Somerset and Union.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on October 17, 2018, 10:04:05 PM
As of today, it is legal to use recreational marijuana in Canada.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/17/world/canada/marijuana-pot-cannabis-legalization.html

Quote from: DanBilefsky
Oct. 17, 2018

MONTREAL — Canada on Wednesday became the first major world economy to legalize recreational marijuana, beginning a national experiment that will alter the country’s social, cultural and economic fabric, and present the nation with its biggest public policy challenge in decades.

Across the country, as government pot retailers opened from Newfoundland to British Columbia, jubilant Canadians waited for hours in line to buy the first state-approved joints. For many, it was a seminal moment, akin to the ending of Prohibition in the United States in the 1930s.

It's not really news for the US but it will definitely heavily influence it.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on October 26, 2018, 02:44:37 PM
https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2018/10/top_lawmakers_decline_to_say_when_marijuana_legali.html

Quote from: SusanKLivio
N.J. misses another deadline to legalize weed, but top lawmakers claim it will happen
Updated Oct 23; Posted Oct 22

The top lawmakers in the state Legislature said Monday say they have scrapped a plan to vote Oct. 29 on a bill to legalize recreational marijuana in New Jersey because they remain at odds with Gov. Phil Murphy over what the law should say.

State Senate President Stephen Sweeney, D-Gloucester, and state Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin, D-Middlesex, vowed the vote will occur before the end of the year.

They also stressed that "very few" points of contention are left to hash out with the Murphy administration, and remain optimistic they could reach an accord.

The latest delay-- one in a series of soft deadlines lawmakers have bandied about -- does not come as a surprise. Any bill must pass committee hearings in both houses of the Legislature and no hearings have been scheduled.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on October 30, 2018, 11:42:43 AM
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/coca-cola-not-getting-cannabis-drink-market-ceo-152027188.html

Quote
Count Coca-Cola out of the budding cannabis market.

Coca-Cola president and CEO James Quincey told Yahoo Finance on Tuesday the beverage giant has no plans to enter the cannabis drink space. In September, Coke said it was “closely watching” the space and had not yet decided on whether to get involved.

The company was rumored to be nearing a partnership with Aurora Cannabis.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on November 07, 2018, 11:59:20 PM
Jeff Sessions resigned today. He was the Attorney General for the President of the United States. He was heavily against marijuana.

Quote
Sessions, a longtime opponent of attempts to legalize marijuana, lifted an Obama-era policy (known as the Cole Memo) earlier this year that kept federal authorities from cracking down on the pot trade in states where the drug is legal. The former attorney general opted to leave the decision on what to do when state rules conflict with federal drug laws in the hands of prosecutors.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/11/07/politics/sessions-resign/index.html

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/sessions-is-rescinding-obama-era-directive-for-feds-to-back-off-marijuana-enforcement-in-states-with-legal-pot/2018/01/04/b1a42746-f157-11e7-b3bf-ab90a706e175_story.html?utm_term=.f5133d77a7b3

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/11/07/pot-stock-tilray-up-22percent-after-jeff-sessions-quits-as-attorney-general.html
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on November 14, 2018, 11:07:37 PM
https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2018/11/first_pass_at_legal_weed_could_roll_into_statehouse_in_days_but_full_vote_will_require_joint_effort.html

Quote
New Jersey lawmakers could finally -- finally -- begin voting on legislation to legalize recreational marijuana in the state within two weeks.

But as for when final votes will take place? That's still up in the air.

The top two leaders of the state Legislature said Wednesday they expect legislation making cannabis legal to be voted out of committee by the end of the month. That would be the first legislative hurdle the measure has to clear.

State Senate President Stephen Sweeney, D-Gloucester, said he's targeted Nov. 26 for a vote at the Statehouse in Trenton. State Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin, D-Middlesex, did not specify a date.

"We certainly have the votes to get it out of committee," Coughlin said during a panel of legislative leaders at the New Jersey League of Municipalities' annual conference in Atlantic City. "We believe we will have the votes when it comes to the floor."
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on November 22, 2018, 11:10:36 AM
LINK (https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2018/11/nj_senate_finally_schedules_hearing_on_legalizatio.html?utm_medium=social&utm_content=nj_facebook_njcom&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=njcom_sf)

Quote
...it's getting the fast-track treatment, even though legislative leaders and Gov. Phil Murphy remain at odds over details of the legislation.

Separate state Assembly and Senate committees will meet together for a hearing of debate and are expected to vote on the legalization bill on Monday, Nov. 26 at 10 a.m., according to sources familiar with the plan.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on November 24, 2018, 01:33:28 PM
Saw this posted on Facebook from NJ.com
Quote
Legislators have unveiled the most recent version of a blueprint to create a multi-billion-dollar legal marijuana industry in New Jersey. Here are some of the highlights. http://nj-ne.ws/VrdXuQe
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on November 26, 2018, 11:25:35 PM
Saw this posted on Facebook from NJ.com
Quote
Legislators have unveiled the most recent version of a blueprint to create a multi-billion-dollar legal marijuana industry in New Jersey. Here are some of the highlights. http://nj-ne.ws/VrdXuQe

Seems like they're moving along with it..

https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2018/11/legal_weed_bill_gets_one_step_closer_to_reality_in.html
Quote from: PaytonGuion
After months of false starts and delays, New Jersey took a big step Monday toward legal weed, with state lawmakers advancing a bill that would legalize the possession and personal use of recreational marijuana.

Committees from both the state Senate and Assembly approved the bill, which now awaits a full vote in the Democrat-controlled state Legislature before it could be signed into law by Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy.

After nearly four hours of debate in a hearing room packed with about 200 people, the bill cleared the Senate budget committee, 7-4 with two abstentions, and then Assembly budget panel, 7-2, with one abstention.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 05, 2018, 03:14:55 PM
"What will happen to medical marijuana if NJ legalizes weed?"

https://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/business/what-will-happen-to-medical-marijuana-if-nj-legalizes-weed/article_159c3978-59f9-51a8-845d-d86d7fd5ce44.html

Quote
Ideas that the medical program and its expansion efforts will become obsolete if marijuana is legalized for recreational use are unfounded as it will remain the only access point to marijuana that is guaranteed to be overseen by doctors and other medical professionals, Wolski said.

“You have physicians supervising on the medical side, and there will always be people who are not comfortable taking any kinds of medications unless their physicians know about it,” he said. “And with a tightly regulated medical program, we can expect a tightly regulated recreational program.”
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 05, 2018, 03:18:05 PM
https://www.app.com/story/opinion/columnists/2018/12/04/marijuana-legalization-new-jersey-vote-no-cardinale/2201096002/

Quote from: Gerald Cardinale
One of the biggest lies being told by the proponents is that marijuana is harmless and non-addictive. Wrong. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 25 to 50 percent of daily marijuana users become addicted.

It’s not just that more adults are using marijuana now. In states where marijuana is legal, children as young as 12 years old are using marijuana at higher rates than the national average for youth. Enforcement is difficult and costly.

In post-legalization states, mothers are using pot during pregnancy at higher rates. Their children often have low birth weights. That hasn’t stopped New Jersey leaders from ignoring the cries of these children, or from dismissing evidence that many other medical conditions are also aggravated by marijuana usage.

Both Harvard and Northwestern studies show that marijuana can harm the brain. Respected medical journals have shown how the drug can alter one’s perception, behavior, and reaction time.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: andyassur on December 06, 2018, 12:16:26 PM
https://www.app.com/story/opinion/columnists/2018/12/04/marijuana-legalization-new-jersey-vote-no-cardinale/2201096002/

Quote from: Gerald Cardinale
One of the biggest lies being told by the proponents is that marijuana is harmless and non-addictive. Wrong. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, 25 to 50 percent of daily marijuana users become addicted.

It’s not just that more adults are using marijuana now. In states where marijuana is legal, children as young as 12 years old are using marijuana at higher rates than the national average for youth. Enforcement is difficult and costly.

In post-legalization states, mothers are using pot during pregnancy at higher rates. Their children often have low birth weights. That hasn’t stopped New Jersey leaders from ignoring the cries of these children, or from dismissing evidence that many other medical conditions are also aggravated by marijuana usage.

Both Harvard and Northwestern studies show that marijuana can harm the brain. Respected medical journals have shown how the drug can alter one’s perception, behavior, and reaction time.

 i think this is incorrect information
Quote
Also, in Colorado, there was a 48 percent increase in marijuana-related motor vehicle fatalities after legalization.


Quote
They found that over that time period, collisions claim frequencies in the states that had legalized marijuana were about 3 percent higher than would have been anticipated without legalization.

Quote
a second study, published in the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH), that found no increase in vehicle crash fatalities in Colorado and Washington, relative to similar states, after legalization.

The authors of that study analyzed federal data on fatal car crashes from 2009 to 2015. “We found no significant association between recreational marijuana legalization in Washington and Colorado and subsequent changes in motor vehicle crash fatality rates in the first 3 years after recreational marijuana legalization,” they concluded.

Quote
The studies measured slightly different things: IIHS looked at claims for motor vehicle collisions, while the AJPH report focused more specifically on fatal crashes. It seems plausible that legalization could lead to a slight increase in minor accidents that don't prove fatal.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/06/26/what-marijuana-legalization-did-to-car-accident-rates/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.cfbe4191e6e3 (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/06/26/what-marijuana-legalization-did-to-car-accident-rates/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.cfbe4191e6e3)

Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 06, 2018, 02:48:12 PM
https://www.app.com/story/opinion/columnists/2018/12/04/marijuana-legalization-new-jersey-vote-no-cardinale/2201096002/

 i think this is incorrect information
Quote
Also, in Colorado, there was a 48 percent increase in marijuana-related motor vehicle fatalities after legalization.
I'm assuming just this above quote is about the APP article? Yes, I would agree with it being inaccurate but I was just siting and quoting it.

I'm assuming the below quotes are about the WP article? Yes, I would agree.
Quote
They found that over that time period, collisions claim frequencies in the states that had legalized marijuana were about 3 percent higher than would have been anticipated without legalization.

Quote
a second study, published in the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH), that found no increase in vehicle crash fatalities in Colorado and Washington, relative to similar states, after legalization.

The authors of that study analyzed federal data on fatal car crashes from 2009 to 2015. “We found no significant association between recreational marijuana legalization in Washington and Colorado and subsequent changes in motor vehicle crash fatality rates in the first 3 years after recreational marijuana legalization,” they concluded.

Quote
The studies measured slightly different things: IIHS looked at claims for motor vehicle collisions, while the AJPH report focused more specifically on fatal crashes. It seems plausible that legalization could lead to a slight increase in minor accidents that don't prove fatal.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/06/26/what-marijuana-legalization-did-to-car-accident-rates/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.cfbe4191e6e3 (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/06/26/what-marijuana-legalization-did-to-car-accident-rates/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.cfbe4191e6e3)
I got confused what was quoting what lol. I usually put the site then quote it. Yea all these studies come out but everything is trying to counter the other without showing an overall picture. "Crashes went up" well ok when, where, and how long? Did it happen in just one place? I hate studies that lack data or don't go over the objective or at least don't talk about the objective. It's worse if they do have an objective but the journalist isn't documenting it.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: andyassur on December 07, 2018, 08:37:38 AM
https://www.app.com/story/opinion/columnists/2018/12/04/marijuana-legalization-new-jersey-vote-no-cardinale/2201096002/

 i think this is incorrect information
Quote
Also, in Colorado, there was a 48 percent increase in marijuana-related motor vehicle fatalities after legalization.
I'm assuming just this above quote is about the APP article? Yes, I would agree with it being inaccurate but I was just siting and quoting it.
that would be correct sorry for the confusion

I'm assuming the below quotes are about the WP article? Yes, I would agree.
Quote
They found that over that time period, collisions claim frequencies in the states that had legalized marijuana were about 3 percent higher than would have been anticipated without legalization.

Quote
a second study, published in the American Journal of Public Health (AJPH), that found no increase in vehicle crash fatalities in Colorado and Washington, relative to similar states, after legalization.

The authors of that study analyzed federal data on fatal car crashes from 2009 to 2015. “We found no significant association between recreational marijuana legalization in Washington and Colorado and subsequent changes in motor vehicle crash fatality rates in the first 3 years after recreational marijuana legalization,” they concluded.

Quote
The studies measured slightly different things: IIHS looked at claims for motor vehicle collisions, while the AJPH report focused more specifically on fatal crashes. It seems plausible that legalization could lead to a slight increase in minor accidents that don't prove fatal.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/06/26/what-marijuana-legalization-did-to-car-accident-rates/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.cfbe4191e6e3 (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/06/26/what-marijuana-legalization-did-to-car-accident-rates/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.cfbe4191e6e3)
I got confused what was quoting what lol. I usually put the site then quote it. Yea all these studies come out but everything is trying to counter the other without showing an overall picture. "Crashes went up" well ok when, where, and how long? Did it happen in just one place? I hate studies that lack data or don't go over the objective or at least don't talk about the objective. It's worse if they do have an objective but the journalist isn't documenting it.

everyone has an agenda and will feed what ever information it is to support their case

anyone could use an argument that is wrong but with the statistics make it sound right.

for instance
Quote
10 percent of all teen driving fatalities in 2016 involved distracted driving
which means 90% weren't so distracting driving is good!
https://www.edgarsnyder.com/car-accident/who-was-injured/teen/teen-driving-statistics.html (https://www.edgarsnyder.com/car-accident/who-was-injured/teen/teen-driving-statistics.html)
which we know is incorrect. might be a bad example but you get the point


Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 07, 2018, 10:25:07 AM
everyone has an agenda and will feed what ever information it is to support their case

anyone could use an argument that is wrong but with the statistics make it sound right.

for instance
Quote
10 percent of all teen driving fatalities in 2016 involved distracted driving
which means 90% weren't so distracting driving is good!
https://www.edgarsnyder.com/car-accident/who-was-injured/teen/teen-driving-statistics.html (https://www.edgarsnyder.com/car-accident/who-was-injured/teen/teen-driving-statistics.html)
which we know is incorrect. might be a bad example but you get the point
Agenda or not, making a false claim backed by good data doesn't make your claim true. The information and claims in the article I posted aren't false but more misleading (I'm sure we both agree). I want to make sure I'm posting anything with good data from good sources. When you posted opposing data then that's what makes this thread so good. It takes all the data and makes a larger picture. Trust me I get your point but just not in the exact worded context.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 11, 2018, 10:53:30 PM
https://www.nj.com/expo/news/erry-2018/12/64cb95fd7e1151/nj-is-moving-toward-legal-weed.html

Quote
The number of towns with some sort of ban or opposition of marijuana is now at least 50, nearly 10 percent of all the towns in the state.

While legal weed is not yet a done deal in New Jersey, as the full Legislature must still approve the bill and the governor must sign it, many more towns in the state have taken an opposing stance than a supportive one.

If legalization does happen, these towns would not be able to prevent residents who are at least 21 year old from possessing small amounts of weed and using it in a private residence. But they can prevent marijuana businesses from growing and selling in their limits. See below for the towns that taken that step.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: andyassur on December 12, 2018, 07:07:02 AM
https://www.nj.com/expo/news/erry-2018/12/64cb95fd7e1151/nj-is-moving-toward-legal-weed.html

Quote
The number of towns with some sort of ban or opposition of marijuana is now at least 50, nearly 10 percent of all the towns in the state.

While legal weed is not yet a done deal in New Jersey, as the full Legislature must still approve the bill and the governor must sign it, many more towns in the state have taken an opposing stance than a supportive one.

If legalization does happen, these towns would not be able to prevent residents who are at least 21 year old from possessing small amounts of weed and using it in a private residence. But they can prevent marijuana businesses from growing and selling in their limits. See below for the towns that taken that step.

no tax revenue for those towns. brick isnt on that list. maybe my neighbors will go out of business and i dont have to get a contract high every time i open the windows.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 12, 2018, 07:12:52 AM
no tax revenue for those towns. brick isnt on that list. maybe my neighbors will go out of business and i dont have to get a contract high every time i open the windows.
This will def be interesting to see how this plays out.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 13, 2018, 11:38:53 AM
https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2018/12/an-nj-university-started-offering-marijuana-classes-this-year-now-its-getting-some-help.html

Quote
Stockton University launched its medical marijuana program this fall, with students taking a course in cannabis law, becoming one of the first institutions in the state to embrace marijuana.

Now, Stockton has partnered with the New Jersey CannaBusiness Association, the state’s primary industry group, in an effort to bolster the medical marijuana program.

The CannaBusiness Association announced the partnership on Wednesday, saying that it would help the school bring in guest speakers from the industry and place students in medical marijuana internships.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: andyassur on December 13, 2018, 11:44:54 AM
https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2018/12/an-nj-university-started-offering-marijuana-classes-this-year-now-its-getting-some-help.html

Quote
Stockton University launched its medical marijuana program this fall, with students taking a course in cannabis law, becoming one of the first institutions in the state to embrace marijuana.

Now, Stockton has partnered with the New Jersey CannaBusiness Association, the state’s primary industry group, in an effort to bolster the medical marijuana program.

The CannaBusiness Association announced the partnership on Wednesday, saying that it would help the school bring in guest speakers from the industry and place students in medical marijuana internships.

would these interns be drug tested?
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 13, 2018, 11:54:00 AM
https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2018/12/an-nj-university-started-offering-marijuana-classes-this-year-now-its-getting-some-help.html

Quote
Stockton University launched its medical marijuana program this fall, with students taking a course in cannabis law, becoming one of the first institutions in the state to embrace marijuana.

Now, Stockton has partnered with the New Jersey CannaBusiness Association, the state’s primary industry group, in an effort to bolster the medical marijuana program.

The CannaBusiness Association announced the partnership on Wednesday, saying that it would help the school bring in guest speakers from the industry and place students in medical marijuana internships.

would these interns be drug tested?
Sounds like a fair question to me.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 13, 2018, 11:56:24 AM
"Study Shows Heavy Adolescent Pot Use Permanently Lowers IQ"

https://www.forbes.com/sites/travisbradberry/2015/02/10/new-study-shows-smoking-pot-permanently-lowers-iq/#56e9da862f5b

Quote
A study more than thirty years in the making found that smoking marijuana permanently lowers intelligence, or IQ.  Frequent pot smokers (even those who had given up marijuana) tended to have deficits in memory, concentration, and overall IQ. The reduction in IQ for those who smoked pot heavily prior to age 18 was most pronounced: an average of eight points. An eight point reduction in IQ is enough to have a significant, negative impact upon your life. To put it into context, consider that individuals with an IQ of 110 have an average net worth of $71,000 and individuals with an IQ of 120 have an average net worth of $128,000. It looks like smoking pot can lower your tax bracket.

What's significant about this research is that it was a longitudinal study: researchers followed and tested subjects from birth through to age 38, noting when and how frequently they picked up habits like drug use. Previous studies scrutinized marijuana use at a single point in time, which failed to eliminate the possibility that people with lower IQs are more likely to smoke pot. The longitudinal research provided a baseline IQ score for all subjects, which revealed changes in IQ scores as they picked up new habits, such as smoking pot.

By following subjects for decades, the researchers were able to measure the lasting effects of adolescent marijuana use (even after subjects gave up smoking pot). These effects last because the teenage brain is still developing at a rapid pace; myriad new pathways for thinking are formed during this period while others are weeded out. When teenagers expose their brains to a damaging substance like marijuana, the effects aren't just drastic...they're permanently etched into the brain. Indeed, the reduction in IQ from smoking marijuana regularly was much greater for those who started smoking as teenagers than those who started in adulthood.

Quote
While the study didn't measure the effects of marijuana upon teenagers' emotional intelligence, it's likely they are dire. Emotional intelligence (EQ) in teenagers lags behind their cognitive development. This explains why teenagers are so impulsive, emotional, and prone to risky behavior. Since teenagers' EQ develops much later than their IQ, this area of the brain is even more susceptible to the negative influences of marijuana.

They did site the study here:
https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2012/08/22/1206820109

Sited website from study webpage:
https://www.pnas.org/content/109/40/E2657
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 13, 2018, 12:03:28 PM
Not sure how reputable this website but I found this. Seems to be posted less than an hour ago.

"Congress Votes to Legalize Hemp, Trump’s Signature Expected Soon"

https://only420.com/8700/marijuana-news/congress-voted-legalize-hemp-trump-signature-expected/?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

Quote
Members of Congress in both the House and Senate have voted to approve the reconciled 2018 Farm Bill, which includes the federal legalization of industrial hemp cultivation and sales. President Trump has voiced his support for the bill and is expected to sign it into law this month.

The Senate voted 87-13 on Dec 12 to approve the revised language, according to Business Insider [Sited link (1)].  The House also passed the bill with overwhelming support in a vote of 369-47.

Hemp will now be classified as an agricultural crop and will no longer be mixed into the same classification as cannabis and marijuana. Hemp will be treated like any other crop, such as corn.

Sited link (1):
"Congress just quietly passed a law that could spark a boom for the $1 billion marijuana-linked CBD industry"
https://www.businessinsider.com/farm-bill-legalizes-hemp-boom-marijuana-cbd-industry-2018-12

Quote
This also opens the doors for FDIC banks to work with hemp farmers and hemp-related companies. As well, research into hemp will be conducted on larger scales and hemp-related issues will be eligible for federal grants.

There are still questions surrounding how the DEA will handle CBD. But with hemp legalized, CBD extracted from hemp should also be legal.

Some controversy may arise in debating how to handle hemp-derived CBD. For now, according to DEA spokesperson Katherine Pfaff, if CBD items are “intended for human consumption” it’s likely to remain a Schedule I drug. But, the legalization of hemp means that the DEA will have to take another look at CBD.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: andyassur on December 13, 2018, 12:07:38 PM
"Study Shows Heavy Adolescent Pot Use Permanently Lowers IQ"

https://www.forbes.com/sites/travisbradberry/2015/02/10/new-study-shows-smoking-pot-permanently-lowers-iq/#56e9da862f5b

Quote
A study more than thirty years in the making found that smoking marijuana permanently lowers intelligence, or IQ.  Frequent pot smokers (even those who had given up marijuana) tended to have deficits in memory, concentration, and overall IQ. The reduction in IQ for those who smoked pot heavily prior to age 18 was most pronounced: an average of eight points. An eight point reduction in IQ is enough to have a significant, negative impact upon your life. To put it into context, consider that individuals with an IQ of 110 have an average net worth of $71,000 and individuals with an IQ of 120 have an average net worth of $128,000. It looks like smoking pot can lower your tax bracket.

What's significant about this research is that it was a longitudinal study: researchers followed and tested subjects from birth through to age 38, noting when and how frequently they picked up habits like drug use. Previous studies scrutinized marijuana use at a single point in time, which failed to eliminate the possibility that people with lower IQs are more likely to smoke pot. The longitudinal research provided a baseline IQ score for all subjects, which revealed changes in IQ scores as they picked up new habits, such as smoking pot.

By following subjects for decades, the researchers were able to measure the lasting effects of adolescent marijuana use (even after subjects gave up smoking pot). These effects last because the teenage brain is still developing at a rapid pace; myriad new pathways for thinking are formed during this period while others are weeded out. When teenagers expose their brains to a damaging substance like marijuana, the effects aren't just drastic...they're permanently etched into the brain. Indeed, the reduction in IQ from smoking marijuana regularly was much greater for those who started smoking as teenagers than those who started in adulthood.

Quote
While the study didn't measure the effects of marijuana upon teenagers' emotional intelligence, it's likely they are dire. Emotional intelligence (EQ) in teenagers lags behind their cognitive development. This explains why teenagers are so impulsive, emotional, and prone to risky behavior. Since teenagers' EQ develops much later than their IQ, this area of the brain is even more susceptible to the negative influences of marijuana.

They did site the study here:
https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2012/08/22/1206820109

Sited website from study webpage:
https://www.pnas.org/content/109/40/E2657
when i smoked weed i felt more then 8 points dumber

Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 13, 2018, 12:26:35 PM
"Study Shows Heavy Adolescent Pot Use Permanently Lowers IQ"

https://www.forbes.com/sites/travisbradberry/2015/02/10/new-study-shows-smoking-pot-permanently-lowers-iq/#56e9da862f5b

Quote
A study more than thirty years in the making found that smoking marijuana permanently lowers intelligence, or IQ.  Frequent pot smokers (even those who had given up marijuana) tended to have deficits in memory, concentration, and overall IQ. The reduction in IQ for those who smoked pot heavily prior to age 18 was most pronounced: an average of eight points. An eight point reduction in IQ is enough to have a significant, negative impact upon your life. To put it into context, consider that individuals with an IQ of 110 have an average net worth of $71,000 and individuals with an IQ of 120 have an average net worth of $128,000. It looks like smoking pot can lower your tax bracket.

What's significant about this research is that it was a longitudinal study: researchers followed and tested subjects from birth through to age 38, noting when and how frequently they picked up habits like drug use. Previous studies scrutinized marijuana use at a single point in time, which failed to eliminate the possibility that people with lower IQs are more likely to smoke pot. The longitudinal research provided a baseline IQ score for all subjects, which revealed changes in IQ scores as they picked up new habits, such as smoking pot.

By following subjects for decades, the researchers were able to measure the lasting effects of adolescent marijuana use (even after subjects gave up smoking pot). These effects last because the teenage brain is still developing at a rapid pace; myriad new pathways for thinking are formed during this period while others are weeded out. When teenagers expose their brains to a damaging substance like marijuana, the effects aren't just drastic...they're permanently etched into the brain. Indeed, the reduction in IQ from smoking marijuana regularly was much greater for those who started smoking as teenagers than those who started in adulthood.

Quote
While the study didn't measure the effects of marijuana upon teenagers' emotional intelligence, it's likely they are dire. Emotional intelligence (EQ) in teenagers lags behind their cognitive development. This explains why teenagers are so impulsive, emotional, and prone to risky behavior. Since teenagers' EQ develops much later than their IQ, this area of the brain is even more susceptible to the negative influences of marijuana.

They did site the study here:
https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2012/08/22/1206820109

Sited website from study webpage:
https://www.pnas.org/content/109/40/E2657
when i smoked weed i felt more then 8 points dumber
Haha I sure a lot of people would agree. I think it was more to outline use of the product during childhood development. Between the age of 9 to 19 is such a HUGE stage of a peoples brain development. Definitely don't wanna mess with that. Most places are placing an age limit of around 21 years old so a new study would need to be based on someone starting after that age.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 14, 2018, 07:09:54 PM
https://patch.com/new-jersey/newarknj/nj-marijuana-legalization-delayed-again-more-towns-ban-it

Quote
NJ Marijuana Legalization Delayed, Again, As More Towns Ban It
..
"We really had our first significant conversation today on it," Sweeney told nj.com. "I wouldn't classify anything today as negative. We had a pretty healthy conversation."

Last month, the Senate Budget and Appropriations Committee vote was 7-4 in favor, while the Assembly Appropriations Committee voted 7-3 to advance the bill. The move was significant because New Jersey had planned a full Legislature vote by Oct. 29, but continued disagreement over the legislation delayed it.

The "Marijuana Legalization Act" would allow users 21 years old and up to possess up to an ounce of pot.

Sweeney's office has acknowledged that the senate president doesn't have an agreement with the Murphy administration on how the legislation should proceed.

Conflicts over how much marijuana should be taxed – among other issues – have impeded the legislation's progress. Sweeney has said that the tax should be no more than 12 percent.
Murphy's deputy press secretary, Alyana Alfaro, released a statement last month, saying: "Governor Murphy remains committed to legalizing adult-use marijuana, a critical step in eliminating racial disparities in our criminal justice system.

"The governor is committed to working with the Legislature to legalize adult-use marijuana the right way, one that makes the state fairer, prioritizes the safety of New Jersey residents, and ensures that some of the economic benefits go the communities hardest hit by the war on drugs."
Murphy, meanwhile, was recently asked about marijuana legalization during a recent Facebook live interview, and he told the audience that he's looking at signing something "sooner than later."

"We've had good exchanges with both the legislative leadership sponsors and, most importantly, the teams in the trenches crafting this," Murphy said. "I think it's sooner than later."

Murphy said there will be several pieces to the legislation, including expansion of the medical marijuana program. The "biggest mountain to climb," he said, will be legalizing the drug for recreational use.

Just don't expect pot to be sold in stores right away. The regulatory and licensing process could take another six months after the legislation is passed, health officials say. That schedule could move a lot more quickly if medical marijuana dispensaries are allowed to meet the demand.

https://www.nj.com/expo/news/erry-2018/12/aa9191e4006330/legal-weed-15-minimum-wage-dep.html

https://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2018/Bills/S3000/2703_I1.HTM

This is pretty real now.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on February 27, 2019, 04:12:25 PM
"Marijuana Legalization Bills Are Advancing In Several States"

https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomangell/2019/02/27/marijuana-legalization-bills-are-advancing-in-several-states/amp/

Quote
Three separate New Mexico House and Senate committees have approved two different legal marijuana bills in recent weeks. One proposal that would create a legal system of licensed private businesses to sell cannabis to adults cleared both the House Health and Human Services and Judiciary Committees. A separate Senate bill that would legalize marijuana but allow it to be sold only in state-run stores was approved by the chamber’s Public Affairs Committee.

Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D) supports legalization and has said she would sign a bill into law as long as it contained adequate protections for public health and safety.

Looks like this will pass and they'll have options.

Quote
In New Hampshire, the House Criminal Justice and Public Safety Committee acted last week to advance a marijuana legalization bill. A floor vote before the full House of Representatives is scheduled for Wednesday.


Gov. Chris Sununu (R) said he would veto any cannabis legalization bill that reaches his desk, but the House speaker believes he has enough votes in his chamber, and perhaps in the Senate as well, to override any veto.

An override shows there's a HUGE amount if tension. NJ governors have the item line veto so this would've been killed just like it has in the past.

Quote
In Hawaii, the Senate Judiciary Committee unanimously voted to approve a cannabis legalization bill on February 7. Although floor action hasn’t yet been scheduled, the body’s president said in a speech at the start of the legislative session that considering ending marijuana prohibition would be a priority for 2019.


Gov. David Ige (D) isn’t especially supportive of marijuana law reform, however, so advocates aren’t sure that he would sign a full legalization bill if one reaches his desk. That said, lawmakers are also advancing more modest legislation to simply decriminalize possession of small amounts of cannabis, and supporters are more hopeful the governor would be on board with that reform.

Quote
And in Vermont, where lawmakers legalized low-level possession and home cultivation of cannabis last year, the Senate Judiciary, Finance and Appropriations Committees all voted this month to approve a bill to add in a system of legal marijuana sales. A floor vote in the full Senate, which has on several occasions in past sessions already approved similar bills, is expected on Thursday.

Gov. Phil Scott (R), who signed Vermont’s existing noncommercial legalization policy into law, says he is reluctant to go further until the state has better technology to detect impaired driving. But with such strong support in the legislature—where half of the Senate and more than a third of the House have proactively signed on as cosponsors of the bills—a veto override is not out of the question, nor is the notion that Scott could feel sufficient pressure to let the measure go into law without vetoing it in the first place.

This seems to be a hot question in most places. How do you prove it? Something needs to be figured out.

Quote
This month, House Financial Services subcommittee held a hearing on draft legislation to allow marijuana businesses to access banking services, a key concern for the industry as well as policymakers who understand that forcing cannabis providers to operate on a cash-only basis poses risks to public safety.

The financial services legislation, which could clear the congressional panel within the next several weeks, is part of a step-by-step plan that Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) laid out in what he called a “blueprint” for how Congress can end federal marijuana prohibition in 2019.

This seems to be a key factor. Legal or not how do you protect the money being used in these transactions? This becomes a safety issue. Everyone agrees this isn't the greatest of ideas but if a product is wanted and is safe to a controlled way then setup the system needed. Banks protect the communities from the dangers of theft of funding so that part alone shouldn't even be a question. At least in theory.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on March 21, 2019, 04:52:34 PM
This only pertains to NJ but it mostly reads, "Marijuana Ban Would Be 'Null And Void' Under State Bill" so basically local government gets no say in the matter.

LINK TO ARTICLE (https://patch.com/new-jersey/brick/brick-marijuana-ban-would-be-null-void-under-state-bill?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_term=politics+%26+government&utm_campaign=autopost&utm_content=brick&fbclid=IwAR1RlMEb-1BJTE-SMMjcn0Wj665GfgOFhen3yXdqU7EHDvN3LgiV4J5Tnfo)

Quote
The bill pending in the state Legislature to make adult recreational marijuana use legal may make that five-hour meeting and unanimous vote by the council meaningless.

Senate Bill 2703 (and its companion, Assembly Bill 4497), the bills that would legalize recreational marijuana includes a provision that would make "null and void" any ordinances that have been passed in towns across the state to ban the sales of either or both.

"... any ordinance enacted by a local governmental entity prior to the effective date of this section addressing the issue of prohibiting one or more types of cannabis-related activities within the jurisdiction of the local governmental entity is null and void," the bill says.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on April 14, 2019, 02:35:09 PM
"In the age of legal marijuana, many employers drop ‘zero tolerance’ drug tests"

https://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-marijuana-drug-test-hiring-20190412-story.html

Quote
When Rye Electric was founded in Orange County five years ago, it screened all prospective workers for drugs. If a test showed traces of cannabis, the applicant was nixed.

But the fast-growing construction company, which has a millennial-heavy workforce, has since adapted to the times. “We still do the tests,” Chief Executive Chris Golden said, “but we choose to look the other way on marijuana.”

Some 20 of the company’s 150 workers were hired despite flunking a pre-employment screening for cannabis. “We let them know they can’t do it on the job and we trust them not to,” Golden said.

Honestly, most companies just wanted to be compliant. Due to the nature of this subject, why do some companies still screen for it? Are times changing or are opinions still heavily involved?
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on April 19, 2019, 07:21:01 PM
https://www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2019/4/19/18507811/marijuana-legalization-drugs-federal-policy-enforcement

Quote
This year, April 20th feels different. Marijuana enthusiasts have long celebrated 4/20, but now that businesses are seeing profit potential, they are getting involved, too, with things like $4.20 Lyft credits and CBD-infused Carl’s Jr. hamburgers. Marijuana is a big business, even if it’s not legal everywhere yet. So what’s the current state of marijuana legalization?

"According to Gallup, for example, 66 percent of Americans supported legalization in 2018, compared to about 60 percent just two years earlier."

https://news.gallup.com/poll/243908/two-three-americans-support-legalizing-marijuana.aspx

https://content.gallup.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/1o2qtqypukk-li_-wury3w.png

Quote
Legalizing the use of pot was an unpopular idea when Gallup first asked Americans about it in 1969 -- just 12% at that time said it should be made legal. Support grew in the 1970s but stagnated in the 20% range until the new millennium, when momentum for legalization picked up again. Since 2000, support for legalizing marijuana has trended steeply upward, reaching majority support for the first time in 2013 -- a year after Colorado and Washington voters legalized recreational use of marijuana via ballot initiatives, making them the first states to do so.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on April 24, 2019, 02:09:42 PM
https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikeadams/2019/04/23/federal-marijuana-legalization-is-close-suggests-canopy-acreage-deal/

Interesting...
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on May 10, 2019, 01:46:19 PM
https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2019/05/njs-marijuana-bill-is-nearly-dead-that-means-you-may-get-to-vote-on-making-weed-legal.html

Quote
It’s now all but certain that New Jersey voters, and not lawmakers, will decide whether to legalize recreational marijuana in the state, three legislative sources confirmed to NJ Advance Media late Thursday.

A plan for the state Legislature to pass bill that would make recreational pot legal for those 21 and older in the Garden State is likely “dead,” said the sources, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss private negotiations.

Although Gov. Phil Murphy and his fellow Democrats who lead the Legislature were gunning for a vote this month, one source said there’s “no hope” for that now because they still have not secured enough votes for the measure to pass.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on June 01, 2019, 07:04:01 AM
Look like Illinois is next. They definitely did it right in my opinion.

https://abc7chicago.com/politics/illinois-house-passes-marijuana-legalization-bill/5324375/

Quote
When the Illinois House convened Friday morning, the first bill called was the recreational marijuana bill, which passed out of a House committee Thursday night.

Recreational marijuana is expected to bring in $58 million in 2020, largely from licensing fees and more than double that the next year.

The bill would allow adults 21 and older to purchase and possess up to 30 grams or about an ounce.

"It's a little surreal still. I knew that we were in good shape. I never put a number on it, but this is higher than anything I imagined," said state Rep. Kelly Cassidy, a Democrat from Chicago who sponsored the bill.

The bill was pushed as one emphasizing criminal justice reform first, promising expungement for those convicted of low-level pot possession offenses.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on June 10, 2019, 07:11:56 PM
So who's next to Legalize Recreational Marijuana?

https://www.fool.com/amp/investing/2019/06/09/after-illinois-these-states-could-legalize-recreat.aspx

Quote
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration legalized its first-ever cannabis-derived drug, support for legalization hit an all-time high, and more states than ever have waved the green flag on weed from a medical and/or adult-use perspective, with 33 medical marijuana-legal states, 10 of which also allow adult consumption.

Quote
...Illinois Legislature overwhelmingly voted in favor of House Bill 1438, which is a measure that will legalize recreational marijuana throughout the Land of Lincoln by Jan. 1, 2020. The bill allows adults aged 21 and over to purchase and possess up to 30 grams of cannabis, with nonresidents allowed to possess up to half the amount of state residents.

Quote
The [next] two most logical choices would be New Jersey and New York, both of which have advanced legislation to legalize adult-use marijuana. Unfortunately, both states may have to wait until 2020 before they get their chance at redemption.

In March [2019], New Jersey looked like a near-sure thing to legalize, with Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy and state lawmakers seemingly coming to an agreement on excise tax rates after protracted debates. However, talks abruptly fell apart after Republican lawmakers in the state failed to support the legislation, and in-party squabbling among Democrats over social aspects of the bill removed the majority support needed for it to pass.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on June 20, 2019, 07:32:24 AM
"Nevada is the first U.S. State to Make It Illegal to Refuse Employment for Marijuana Usage--and It Won't Be the Last. How to Adjust Your Drug Screening Policies."

http://www.evilhrlady.org/2019/06/nevada-is-the-first-u-s-state-to-make-it-illegal-to-refuse-employment-for-marijuana-usage-and-it-wont-be-the-last-how-to-adjust-your-drug-screening-policies.html

https://www.inc.com/suzanne-lucas/nevada-is-first-us-state-to-make-it-illegal-to-refuse-employment-for-marijuana-usage-and-it-wont-be-last-how-to-adjust-your-drug-screening-policies.html

Quote
That's not the language used in the bill, but that's what the law does. Instead of leaving it up to an employer to determine if they want a drug free workplace, you have to treat marijuana users as equals to non-users.

New York City has similar legislation which will go into effect shortly after Nevada's, even though New York doesn't have legalized recreational marijuana.

There is logic to this change because unlike alcohol, which clears out of your system relatively rapidly; you can test positive for marijuana when you aren't remotely high. Blood and saliva tests can show if you are under the influence, but not the degree, as you can determine with alcohol. Urine tests will only show that there has been usage. The idea is why worry about what someone did Saturday night when they won't be to work until Monday?

Quote
The new law (which goes into effect on 1 January 2020) has exceptions for the following positions:

  • Firefighters,
  • Emergency medical technicians
  • Employees who operate motor vehicles and who are subject to other state or federal laws,
  • People who "in the determination of the employer could adversely affect the safety of others."

https://legiscan.com/NV/bill/AB132/2019
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on June 25, 2019, 10:37:27 PM
https://www.vox.com/2019/6/25/18650478/illinois-marijuana-legalization-governor-jb-pritzker

https://www.apnews.com/7b793d88f3c84417b83db0f770854960

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/illinois-recreational-marijuana-governor-legalizes-governor-j-b-pritzker-signs-bill-today-2019-06-25/

Quote
Illinois' new governor, J.B. Pritzker, delivered on a top campaign promise Tuesday by signing legislation that makes his state the 11th to legalize small amounts of marijuana for recreational use and the second to approve it through the Legislature rather than the ballot box. The bill, HB 1438, goes into effect Jan. 1, 2020.

Legalization in Illinois also means that nearly 800,000 people with criminal records for purchasing or possessing 30 grams of marijuana or less may have those records expunged, a provision minority lawmakers and interest groups demanded. It also gives cannabis-vendor preference to minority owners and promises 25% of tax revenue from marijuana sales to redevelop impoverished communities.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on July 10, 2019, 04:04:20 PM
Add Hawaii to that list... sorta

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This is different from marijuana legalization. Under decriminalization, possession of small amounts of pot no longer carries jail or prison time but can continue to carry a fine, and possession of larger amounts, repeat offenses, and sales or trafficking can still result in harsher sentences. Under legalization, penalties for marijuana possession are completely removed, and sales are typically allowed.

https://www.vox.com/platform/amp/policy-and-politics/2019/7/9/18623492/hawaii-marijuana-decriminalization-legalization

http://www.forbes.com/sites/sarabrittanysomerset/2019/07/10/hawaii-decriminalizes-cannabis/

Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on November 06, 2019, 03:12:05 PM
Gonna post then update my post with sited paragraphs.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikeadams/2019/11/05/reasons-marijuana-legalization-seems-to-be-failing/

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One of the biggest arguments made by cannabis advocates when trying to sell their spiel to politicians and voters was that legal weed would eliminate the black market. This, they said, would make it more difficult for children to get their hands on pot than in decades past while also generating significant tax revenue for the states. But the underground pot trade hasn’t really gone anywhere. In fact, it is only growing stronger now that criminal organizations have the luxury of being domestically based instead of running distribution from Mexico.

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Furthermore, the black market in legal states is carrying over to areas of prohibition, as well. It is part of the reason that the counterfeit vapes said to be making so many people severely ill (and even killing some) have become so prevalent. Law enforcement agencies all across the country have also been complaining that people trafficking pot in from legal states is making their jobs more difficult.

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Diehard cannabis advocates might argue that all of the black market madness exists because of conflicting federal and state law. There was even a point where I would have been inclined to agree that federal prohibition is the real monster behind all of this ruckus. But I’m not convinced at this juncture, at least not 100 percent. Why? Well, just take a look to the north in Canada, where marijuana has been legal nationwide for the past year. It’s black market pot trade is still way stronger than the legal sector.

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Marijuana legalization, at least as far as the United States is concerned, hasn’t even accomplished the modest task of reducing the number of arrests made in this country for pot possession.

Believe it or not, in spite of more states bringing weed into the mainstream, the latest FBI crime data shows that police forces in America still busted more people for pot last year than they did in 2016 and 2017. Well over a half a million people went to jail for marijuana possession during that time.

Considering all of the insanity surrounding the cannabis trade, it’s hard to argue that marijuana legalization is working. It should be, but the scene is just too convoluted. What’s scary is some 2020 presidential candidates, like Bernie Sanders, have proposed ending federal prohibition using the same types of taxed and regulatory models where high taxes and increased spending are all part of the plan. It’s difficult to imagine, though, knowing what we know now, that the American people are ready to support such a high-dollar scheme. Sure, the polls show the majority of the U.S. population supports marijuana legalization. But that doesn’t mean they will buy it legally once it happens.

EDIT: Ok cited what I was reading mostly. It's a chunk of the article itself but some info could've been left out which I did.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on November 15, 2019, 07:28:53 AM
https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2019/11/another-state-has-legalized-marijuana-sales-begin-dec-1.html

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Michigan adults 21 and older will be able to buy marijuana starting Dec. 1, the state Marijuana Regulatory Agency announced on Wednesday.

Michigan is one of 11 states and the District of Columbia which have legalized the use of marijuana for recreational purposes. The other states are Alaska, California, Colorado, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont and Washington.

Michigan’s medical marijuana dispensaries will be permitted to sell up to 50 percent of cannabis products on the recreational market if they are at least 30 days old, according to a bulletin from the state regulatory agency.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on November 18, 2019, 12:59:45 AM
https://www.fool.com/investing/2019/11/17/6-states-trying-to-legalize-recreational-marijuana.aspx
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on November 20, 2019, 04:49:33 PM
https://www.forbes.com/sites/javierhasse/2019/11/20/marijuana-legalization-judiciary-committee/#189020b2c35a

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In a surprising turn of events, a key Congressional committee, the House Judiciary Committee, has voted to approve the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act of 2019, or H.R. 3884, which would effectively put an end to cannabis prohibition in the United States of America, on a federal level by removing it from the Controlled Substances Act.

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/11/20/house-committee-approves-bill-decriminalizing-marijuana-on-the-federal-level.html
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on December 01, 2019, 09:08:29 PM
Michigan joined the list

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/12/01/legal-weed-michigan-illinois-know-recreational-marijuana/4339486002
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on January 01, 2020, 09:29:17 PM
"Illinois becomes 11th state to legalize marijuana"

https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/476444-illinois-becomes-11th-state-to-legalize-marijuana?amp&__twitter_impression=true
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on February 11, 2020, 11:19:07 PM
Quote
At least 10 governors have gone so far as to put language ending marijuana prohibition in their annual budget requests, or used their State of the State speeches to pressure legislators to act on cannabis reform.

Some are proactively addressing the issue, while others appear to be mostly reacting to support that has already built up among lawmakers. But altogether, it’s clear that top state executives are now taking marijuana more seriously than ever before.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomangell/2020/02/11/governors-across-us-step-up-push-to-legalize-marijuana-in-their-states/amp/
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on April 13, 2020, 05:54:55 PM
Add Virginia to the list.. sorta

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2020/4/13/21158103/virginia-marijuana-legalization-decriminalization
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on June 16, 2020, 10:13:47 PM
O’Fallon (town in Illinois) residents voted to allow sales of legal marijuana. The city may ban it anyway.

https://www.bnd.com/news/local/community/ofallon-progress/article243551837.html

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Speakers cited tax revenue for the city and questioned perceptions about “unfavorables” coming to the city, and that the businesses are highly regulated. Some argued alcohol was more of a societal problem than marijuana.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on June 17, 2020, 09:35:56 PM
"N.J. lawmakers to vote on bill to decriminalize weed Thursday"

https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2020/06/nj-lawmakers-to-vote-on-bill-to-decriminalize-weed-thursday.html

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State lawmakers are scheduled to vote Thursday on one of two proposals to decriminalize weed and curb arrests that disproportionately impact Black people.
Title: Re: Marijuana Legalization
Post by: jdaniele on June 18, 2020, 06:19:30 PM
Looks like this just passed

"N.J. lawmakers to vote on bill to decriminalize weed Thursday"

https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2020/06/nj-lawmakers-to-vote-on-bill-to-decriminalize-weed-thursday.html

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State lawmakers are scheduled to vote Thursday on one of two proposals to decriminalize weed and curb arrests that disproportionately impact Black people.

"Bill to decriminalize marijuana just passed N.J. Assembly. Instead of arrest, a $50 fine."
https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2020/06/bill-to-decriminalize-marijuana-just-passed-nj-assembly-instead-of-arrest-a-50-fine.html

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Lawmakers took a major step in halting arrests for weed Thursday, as they voted on a bill that would decriminalize possession of up to two ounces.

The state Assembly voted 63-10 with five members abstaining to pass the measure (A1897), one of two decriminalization bills currently proposed in the state Legislature. It seeks to replace arrests for possessing up to two ounces of weed with a civil fine of $50, and also lessens jail time and fines for possession of larger amounts of pot on a sliding scale.

The other bill, which would decriminalize up to one pound of weed, was introduced in the state Senate two weeks ago. Neither bill would legalize marijuana, meaning those found with pot on them would still likely have purchased it from a dealer selling illegally. Instead, voters must decide on the ballot in November if the Garden State will allow legal weed sales.

But the changes would mean fewer people facing jail time for nonviolent offenses and clear records of those with past weed convictions. Those arrest records are hurdles for people applying to jobs, loans and public housing.